Ask an Expert
Discuss My Needs
Menu
Discuss My Needs
Ask an Expert
Keyes Life Safety

Our Life Safety educational resource hub is full of healthcare knowledge to help you be better informed of the changing world around you. 

Rather than sit back and act on decisions made by others, we are leading the charge as it relates to identifying best practices for Life Safety Code® and compliance. We have real people that give our clients real information that can be put into practice.

Interested in reading our experts' take on Life Safety? Then subscribe to our free blog below! We discuss readers' questions, share interesting observations from the field, and more.

Design Requirements for Clean Area

by Brad Keyes, CHSP, on Mar 20, 2019 1:00:04 AM

Q: What are the ventilation, air exchange and air pressure standards for an area in a very old basement that is being used to sanitize equipment in a hospital facility? There is a very small area that is used for cleaning and sanitizing with disinfectants that is right next to the clean storage of these equipment pieces after they are cleaned. Is there also a certain type of flooring that should be used to prevent spores from harboring in cracks in the tile? There is no separation from clean to dirty, passing through the clean area with soiled equipment to get to the sanitizing area. How can this be corrected? I want this area to be compliant and my staff safe.

A: For design requirements, you would be expected to comply with your state and local authorities, as well as the 2010 FGI Guidelines, as applicable. I cannot tell you what your state and local requirements are (they often follow the FGI Guidelines), but here is what the 2010 FGI Guidelines require for ventilation for new construction:

Clean workroom or clean holding: 

  • Positive air pressure;
  • 2 minimum outdoor air changes per hour (ach);
  • 4 minimum total ach;
  • No requirement to exhaust air to the outdoors;
  • No restrictions regarding air recirculated by means of room unit;
  • No restrictions on design humidity thresholds;
  • No restrictions on design temperature thresholds.

Soiled workroom or holding area:

  • Negative air pressure;
  • 2 minimum outdoor ach;
  • 10 minimum total ach;
  • All room air must be exhausted to the outdoors;
  • No recirculating the air by means of room units;
  • There are no design RH thresholds;
  • There are no design temperature thresholds.

Sterilizer equipment room:

  • Negative air pressure;
  • 10 minimum ach total, without any outdoor air requirements;
  • All room air must be exhausted to the outdoors;
  • No recirculating the air by means of room units;
  • There are no design RH thresholds;
  • There are no design temperature thresholds.

The flooring would have to be cleanable with seams that cannot trap dirt, such as welded seams on VCT. There are other products available that would work as well. You have a real problem having soiled equipment pass-through the clean area. These different areas have to be separated physically, otherwise you will not be able to meet the ventilation requirements above. Sounds like you need the assistance of a design professional. I suggest you start with an architect who has experience with healthcare facilities.

Topics:VentilationSterile Storage

Real people. Real solutions.

We help you be better informed of the changing world around you.  Our life safety blog answers your real world questions! 

More...

More...

Subscribe to Updates

We care and want to help.

We want to help coach, guide, and navigate you through all things Life Safety.
DISCUSS MY NEEDS