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Frequency Between Fire Pump Tests

by Brad Keyes, CHSP, on Jan 28, 2019 12:00:17 AM

Q: How long is a grace period for the annual fire pump test to be past due?

A: Well, technically, there is no grace period. Either you are compliant or you are not. But most AHJs usually have their way of determining time when it involves frequencies for testing and inspection.

One AHJ may be “by the NFPA book” and when the NFPA code or standard says annually, that means it needs to be done within 12-months of the previous annual test. CMS typically does not allow for more than 12-months for an annual test. In other words, there is no "12-months plus 30-days" for CMS.

But accreditation organizations (AO) seem to have a slightly different interpretation of time. Where NFPA says annually, one AO could mean 12 months from the previous test, plus or minus 30 days. But, as mentioned, CMS does not like the “plus” side of the equation, meaning they don’t mind if you do your flow-test before 12 months has pass from the last test, but they don’t care for one day beyond 12 months. So, state agencies surveying on behalf of CMS would likely cite an organization if the test is one or more days beyond 12 months from the last test, but many accreditation organizations would allow up to 30-days past the 12-month date.

This is one area where NFPA has not clearly defined how they interpret the different time periods for testing or inspection. They purposefully leave this open for the AHJ to decide, but the problem is, hospitals typically have 5 or 6 different AHJs who inspect them for compliance with the Life Safety Code. Chances are, you will never get all 5 or 6 AHJs to agree on what it means. It’s a crap-shoot sometimes. You don’t know how one particular AHJ will respond until they are onsite and write a citation. So, the hospital has to follow the most restrictive interpretation.

Topics:Fire PumpTesting (Fire Suppression Systems)

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