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Keyes Life Safety

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Staff Sleep Rooms

by Brad Keyes, CHSP, on Apr 17, 2019 1:00:10 AM

Q: In regards to audio/visual strobes in staff sleeping rooms, is it required for them to hear the fire alarm system?

A: According to section 26.3.4.5.1 of the 2012 Life Safety Code, single-station smoke alarms are required to be installed in sleeping rooms for lodging or rooming house occupancies. A staff sleeping room in a hospital would have to qualify for the requirements of a lodging or rooming house occupancy, so a single station smoke alarm is required.

A single station smoke alarm has a built-in occupant notification device. But section 9.6.2.10.1.4 of the 2012 Life Safety Code says fire alarm system smoke detectors that comply with NFPA 72 and are arranged to function in the same manner as a single-station smoke alarm shall be permitted in lieu of smoke alarms. Even if you install a fire alarm system smoke detector in the staff sleeping room, section 9.6.2.10.1.4 would imply that some sort of occupant notification device is still required to awaken the staff member sleeping in that room.

But section 18.4.4 of the NFPA 72-2010, allows for the Private Mode installation for fire alarm system occupant notification devices, and hospitals typically are designed to this requirement. Section 18.4.4.1 requires the occupant notification device to have an audible sound level 10 dB above the average ambient sound level to be compliant, and in many cases, an occupant notification device located in the corridor outside of the staff sleeping room can achieve this requirement.

If you measure the dB level inside the staff sleeping room of the corridor-mounted fire alarm system occupant notification device, and it is 10 dB above the average ambient sound level in the staff sleeping room, then you should be good. But have those sound readings available to show the surveyor, as they will want to see some proof of compliance.

Topics:Fire AlarmFire Alarm Notification DevicesOn Call Sleeping Rooms

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